Object

Planned object

Title: Theorizing archaeological practice. An outline

Creator:

Marciniak, Arkadiusz

Date issued/created:

2006

Resource Type:

Article

Subtitle:

Archaeologia Polona Vol. 44 (2006)

Publisher:

Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology Polish Academy of Sciences

Place of publishing:

Warszawa

Description:

24 cm

Abstract:

The paper aims to outline the most crucial elements of archaeological practice in the period of disappearance of monolithic research agendas in prehistoric archaeology. They need to be identified and conceptualized in a highly heterogeneous and idiosyncratic process of collating/combining the entire heuristic potential of individual elements of material culture that constitute an assemblage. In particular, the nature of reasoning processes and strategies of justification is debated to provide the foundations of archaeology as a rigorous discipline able to produce convincing accounts of the past

References:

Biehl, P. F., A. Gramsch and A. Marciniak. 2002. Introduction. In Archaeologies of Europe. History, methods and theories. P. Biehl, A. Gramsch and A. Marciniak (eds), 25—31. Tübingen ; Binford, L.R. 1981. Bones. Ancient men and modern myths. New York ; Bernstein, R.J. 1983. Beyond objectivism and relativism. Science, hermeneutics, and praxis. Philadelphia ; Conee, E. 2005. Contextualism contested. In Contemporary debates in epistemology. M. Steup and E. Sosa (eds), 47-55. Oxford ; Hodder, I. 1991. Interpretive archaeology and its role. American Antiquity 56(1): 7—18 ; Hodder, I. 1999. The archaeological process. An introduction. Oxford—Malden ; Johnson, M. 2006. On the nature of theoretical archaeology and archaeological theory. Archaeological Dialogues 13(2): 117-32 ; Marciniak, A. 1999. Faunal materials and interpretive archaeology — epistemology reconsidered. Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory 6: 293—320 ; Shanks, M. and C. Tilley. 1987. Re-constructing archaeology. Theory and practice. Cambridge ; Wylie, A. 2002a. Introduction. Philosophy from the ground up. In Thinking from things. Essays in the philosophy of archaeology. A. Wylie (ed.), 1—24. Berkeley—Los Angeles—London ; Wylie, A. 2002b. The interpretive dilemma. In Thinking from things. Essays in the philosophy of archaeology. A. Wylie (ed.), 117—26. Berkeley—Los Angeles—London ; Wylie, A. 2002c. Archaeological cables and tacking. Beyond objectivism and relativism. In Thinking from things. Essays in the philosophy of archaeology. A. Wylie (ed.), 161—7. Berkeley—Los Angeles—London ; Wylie, A. 2002d. 'Heavily decomposing red herrings'. Middle ground in the anti-/postprocessual wars. In Thinking from things. Essays in the philosophy of archaeology. A. Wylie (ed.), 171—8. Berkeley—Los Angeles—London ; Wylie, A. 2002e. Rethinking unity as a 'working hypothesis' for philosophy of science. How archaeologies exploit the disunities of science. In Thinking from things. Essays in the philosophy of archaeology. A. Wylie (ed.), 200—10. Berkeley—Los Angeles—London ; Yoffee, N. and A. Sherratt. 1993. Introduction. The sources of archaeological theory. In Archaeological theory. Who sets the agenda? N. Yoffee and A. Sherratt (eds), 1—9. Cambridge

Relation:

Archaeologia Polona

Volume:

44

Start page:

267

End page:

278

Format:

application/octet-stream

Resource Identifier:

0066-5924

Source:

IAiE PAN, call no. P 357 ; IAiE PAN, call no. P 358 ; IAiE PAN, call no. P 356 ; click here to follow the link

Language:

eng

Terms of use:

Copyright-protected material. May be used within the limits of statutory user freedoms

Digitizing institution:

Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology of the Polish Academy of Sciences

Original in:

Library of the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology of the Polish Academy of Sciences

Edition name Date

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